MYTHS of the Season

ChristmasCarolsAlliance Defending Freedom, a non-profit legal organization* that “advocates for the right of people to freely live out their faith,” recently sent a legal memo and fact sheet to more than 13,000 public-school districts to dispel the myths that various Christmas expressions or participation are unconstitutional in a school setting. Here are some of the myths addressed:

  • Myth #1: Students are not allowed to sing religious Christmas carols in public schools.
  • Myth #2: It is unconstitutional for school officials to refer to a school break as a “Christmas Holiday.”
  • Myth #3: It is unconstitutional for public schools to close on religious holidays, such as Christmas or Good Friday.
  • Myth #4: Public schools have to recognize all religious holidays if they recognize Christmas.
  • Myth #5: It is constitutional for public schools to ban teachers and students from saying Merry Christmas.
  • Myth #6: Public schools cannot have students study the religious origins of Christmas and read the biblical accounts of the birth of Christ.
  • Myth #7: Public schools cannot display religious symbols.

These are all myths. Students, teachers, and public schools have constitutional rights to seasonal, religious expression! You may print out a free copy of this helpful fact sheet and then kindly help dispel these myths, yourself.

 

*ADF offers free legal assistance to school districts that need help. More information is at: (480) 444-0020 or www.alliancedefendingfreedom.org .

About Along The Way with Gary Curtis

Gary Curtis served for 27 years, as part of the pastoral staff of The Church on The Way, the First Foursquare Church of Van Nuys, California. In October 2015, Gary retired from leadership of the church’s not-for-profit media outreach, Life On The Way Communications, Inc. He continues to blog at worshipontheway.wordpress.com. Gary and his wife, Alisa, live in southern California. They have two married daughters and five grandchildren.
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